Scroll to top
Interview with Ariel Booker, co-founder of CanO Water

Ariel Booker, Co-Founder, CanO Water

Interview 19 November 2019

Share

After helping to bring the idea and concept of CanO Water to life, Ariel decided to leave his job as a headhunter to focus full time on CanO Water after he and his fellow co-founders noticed a gap in the market for an attractive, plastic alternative. Ariel was most eager to educate people on the benefits of choosing aluminium over plastic and to highlight the impact our current plastic consumption and waste was having on the planet.

Besides keeping you hydrated, CanO Water was created in response to the damaging impact that plastic bottles have on the environment. With approximately 8 million tons of plastic ending up in the ocean each year, CanO Water offers a highly recyclable alternative. Our aluminium cans have the highest recycling rate of any drink on the market; recycle your can and it could be back on the shelf in as little as 6 weeks, and the resealable lid doesn’t affect the recyclability of our aluminium cans.

SPECIAL EDITION CAN FOR #WORLDWATERDAY, MADE IN COLLABORATION WITH CHRISTOPHER RAEBURN. THE CAN WAS DESIGNED FOR ZSL LONDON ZOO, TO REPLACE THEIR PLASTIC WATER BOTTLE
  • How and where did CanO Water emerge?

    The idea to use aluminium cans to package our spring water came in 2015, after we saw the sheer amount of plastics polluting the beaches and oceans in my visit to Thailand. Together with Josh and Perry, we decided to come up with a solution by launching CanO Water. We use aluminium because it’s infinitely recyclable. Only 5% of plastic products are recycled typically, while approximately eight million tonnes of plastic ends up in the ocean each year. Whereas with aluminium, 75% of the metal produced since 1888 is still in circulation. A can can go from the recycling bin back to a shop shelf in six weeks. To make our cans as practical as a water bottle, we created a resealable lid, so our cans can be carried on the go.

  • Why is it important for you to target younger generations?

    Younger generations are inspired and influenced by what they see online, and by their peers. They’re educated and clued up, and they’re more aware of the environment than previous generations have been. With that in mind, we think it’s still important to give them options. As more shops and sites are deciding to remove single-use plastic bottles, I think young generations will be minded to choose a sustainable product so long as the design and quality isn’t compromised.

See Also