On imported deforestation

Share

The realities and challenges of imported deforestation, forest governance and their link with climate change
About

On the road to COP26 and in cooperation with the International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO), REVOLVE organized an International Press Briefing on Tuesday 19 October 3-4pm CET for journalists to interact with four internationally renowned political scientists and forest and land use researchers about the complexities and realities of ‘imported deforestation’.

‘Imported deforestation’ is a central theme to global climate action since what is consumed in urban areas has an impact on forests in other parts of the world; the provenance of forest-risk commodities and how to better conserve and protect forests is a key aspect to the city-forest nexus and to this Press Briefing.

The Press Briefing was exclusive to journalists and was meant to provide insights into the challenges of international forest governance and global deforestation causes and patterns to be able to cover deforestation-related climate issues in a more informed and accurate manner in the lead-up to, during and after UNFCCC COP26 in Glasgow.

The briefing provided a press release as well as FAQs, Facts & Figures, infographics & visuals on imported deforestation, land use governance and climate change, and the opportunity for further interviews with the four experts and other knowledgeable forest and land use governance specialists in different languages.

Experts remain available for interviews in German, English, French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish. And the one-hour recording of the press briefing is available upon request by journalists: please contact Sören Bauer.

In cooperation with:

The experts are:

  • Dr. Metodi Sotirov

    Assistant/Associate Professor at the Chair of Forest and Environmental Policy, University of Freiburg i. Br., Germany
    His main areas of expertise are in forest policy, environmental (biodiversity, climate, timber trade) governance and policy integration.
  • Dr. Connie McDermott

    Jackson Senior Fellow and Associate Professor Land Use and Environmental Change University of Oxford, UK
    Her main areas of expertise are in integration of forest governance into the global climate regime, effects of market globalization on domestic forest policy, certification of forests and forest products, and related initiatives.
  • Dr. Pablo Pacheco

    WWF Global Forests Lead Scientist
    His main areas of expertise are in forest governance and institutions, global environmental change, land systems and deforestation, markets and supply chains, livelihoods and landscape change, and sustainable development.
  • Dr. Sarah Lilian Burns

    Assistant Professor at the Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias y Forestales – Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Argentina
    Her main areas of expertise are in forest policy, international regimes and Latin America.

Additional experts:

  • Dr. Guillaume Lescuyer

    CIFOR Senior Associate
  • Dr. Marie-Gabrielle Piketty

    Economist at Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement (CIRAD)
  • Dr. Paolo Cerutti

    Senior Scientist and Interim Hub Leader – Nairobi, www.cgiar.org
  • Dr. Andre Guimaraes

    Director of Amazon Institute of Environmental Research (IPAM)
Press Release
FAQs

FAQs

English

Prepared in Sep 2021 by Dr Nelson Grima and Dikshya Devkota, IUFRO-GFEP Project Managers

On deforestation

According to FAO, deforestation is either the conversion of forest to another land use, or the long-term (>10 years) reduction of tree canopy cover below 10% of the area. Deforestation defined broadly includes also degradation that reduces forest quality.

According to FAO, from 2015 to 2020 the collaborating countries reported a global tree cover loss of 1.64%, while Global Forest Watch (GFW) estimated from remote sensing data a loss of 4.19% for the same period. A longer time period provided by GFW shows that from 2001 to 2020 the world lost 411.4 Mha (10.5%) of tree cover.

“The most important direct causes are the conversion of forested lands for agriculture and cattle-raising, logging, urbanization, mining and oil exploitation, acid rain, and fire” (FAO 2007, p.11).

Besides the direct causes, the underlying causes include major international economic phenomena, deep-rooted social structures, which result in inequalities in land tenure, discrimination against indigenous peoples, subsistence farmers and poor people in general, political factors such as the lack of participatory democracy, the influence of the military and the exploitation of rural areas by urban elites, and overconsumption by consumers in high-income countries (FAO 2007).

Deforestation has many socio-ecological and economic consequences with devastating long-term impacts, such as the destruction of traditional lifestyles and religious beliefs, breakdown of social institutions, or encroachment of indigenous communities resulting in violent confrontations. Economically, deforestation not only represents a loss in forest capital (valued at USD 45 billion in 2007) but also, all potential future revenues and future employment that could be derived from their sustainable management for timber and non-timber products disappear. One of the most serious consequences of deforestation is the loss of biodiversity (estimated annual extinction of 50,000 species). Deforestation is also an important contributor to global warming (about 25% of the total CO2 emissions), it disrupts weather patterns creating hotter and drier weather, affects water quality and flow, and contributes to soil degradation and desertification.

FLEGT stands for Forest Law Enforcement, Governance, and Trade. The EU’s FLEGT Action Plan was established in 2003 aiming to reduce illegal logging by strengthening sustainable and legal forest management, improving governance, and promoting trade in legally produced timber. Partnerships have been formed under FLEGT to transform the timber sector, combat illegal logging, strengthen forest governance, and encourage sustainable economic development.

On imported deforestation

Imported deforestation is the deforestation caused by the production of goods that are consumed by a population elsewhere.

The larger importers of deforestation are the high-income countries, China, and India, mainly through the import of agricultural products, pulp and paper, energy, and minerals.

Forest-risk commodities (FRC) are globally traded goods and raw materials that originate from tropical forest ecosystems, either directly from within forest areas, or from areas previously under forest cover, whose extraction or production contributes significantly to global tropical deforestation and degradation.

On land use governance

Governance refers to the formation and stewardship of the formal and informal rules that regulate the public realm, the arena in which the state, as well as economic and societal actors, interact to make decisions (Hydén and Mease, 2004).

Land use governance is about the decisions that are made regarding access to land and its use, the manner in which these decisions are implemented and enforced, and the way that competing interests in land are managed.

Is the way in which public and private actors, including formal and informal institutions, and other stakeholders negotiate, make, and enforce binding decisions about the management, use, and conservation of forest resources.

In most parts of the world, the state continues to be the dominant authority in governing forests. Current forest governance comes mainly in three forms: decentralization (the state transfers technical capacity and/or formal authority to local administration), participation (forest management is implemented by local communities themselves or jointly with regional forest departments), and marketization (market-based mechanisms are applied to guarantee the conservation or improvement of forests).

At the global level, forest governance is highly fragmented. The international forest regime includes regulations in various forest-related intergovernmental bodies, eg. UNFCCC, CBD, UNFF, etc. In addition, several (often market-based) governance frameworks involving private actors have also been established. Examples are Participatory Forest Management (PFM) in its diverse forms, forest certification (with its two main promoters being the Forest Stewardship Council – FSC, and the Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification – PEFC), or the different Payment for Ecosystem Services (PES) schemes (including REDD+).

An interest in developing a global framework to address deforestation was expressed by a few countries several decades ago, however, no agreement was reached.

At national and regional levels, several regulations address imported deforestation. For example, the EU’s FLEGT regulation (2005) controls the entry of timber to its territory by signing with third countries the Voluntary Partnership Agreements (VPAs). Other bilateral agreements, such as United States’ trade promotion agreement with Peru (2007) contains mandatory provisions to address illegal logging, improve forest enforcements, track protected tree species through the supply chain and the management of forest concessions. Many other countries also have plans to develop regulations to address imported deforestation.

On (Imported) deforestation, land use/forest governance – and climate change

Clearing forests not only reduces the number of trees that capture greenhouse gases preventing them from accumulating in the atmosphere and warming the Earth, but it also creates emissions by releasing the carbon stored in trees back to the atmosphere. Deforestation causes around 10-20% of global emissions.

It should promote predictable, open, and informed policymaking based on transparent processes, as well as a bureaucracy imbued with a professional ethos, an executive arm of government accountable for its actions, and a strong civil society participating in decisions related to the sector.

Deutsch

Zusammengestellt von Dr. Nelson Grima und Dikshya Devkota, IUFRO-GFEP Projektmanager, im September 2021.

Zur Entwaldung

Laut FAO ist Entwaldung entweder die Umwandlung von Wald in eine andere Landnutzung oder die langfristige (>10 Jahre) Reduzierung der Baumkronenbedeckung unter 10% der Fläche. Entwaldung im im weitesten Sinn umfasst auch Degradation, die die Waldqualität verringert.

Laut FAO meldeten die kooperierenden Länder von 2015 bis 2020 einen globalen Verlust an Waldfläche von 1,64%, während Global Forest Watch (GFW) aus Fernerkundungsdaten einen Verlust von 4,19% für den gleichen Zeitraum schätzte. Ein längerer Zeitraum, der von GFW zur Verfügung gestellt wird, zeigt, dass die Welt von 2001 bis 2020 411,4 Mha (10,5%) der Baumbedeckung verloren hat.

“Die wichtigsten direkten Ursachen der Entwaldung sind Abholzung, die Umwandlung von Waldflächen für Landwirtschaft und Viehzucht, Urbanisierung, Bergbau und Ölförderung, saurer Regen und Feuer” (FAO 2007, S.11).

Neben den direkten Ursachen gibt es tiefer liegende Gründe wie große internationale Wirtschaftsphänomene, tief verwurzelte soziale Strukturen, die zu Ungleichheiten bei Landbesitz führen, Diskriminierung indigener Völker, Subsistenzbauern und armer Menschen im allgemeinen, politische Faktoren wie das Fehlen einer partizipativen Demokratie, der Einfluss des Militärs und die Ausbeutung ländlicher Gebiete durch städtische Eliten, sowie übermäßiger Konsum von Verbrauchern in Ländern mit hohen Einkommen (FAO 2007).

Die Entwaldung hat viele sozio-ökologische und ökonomische Folgen mit verheerenden langfristigen Auswirkungen, wie die Zerstörung traditioneller Lebensstile und religiöser Überzeugungen, den Zusammenbruch sozialer Institutionen oder das Eindringen in indigene Gemeinschaften, was zu gewalttätigen Konfrontationen führt. Wirtschaftlich gesehen bedeutet die Entwaldung nicht nur einen Verlust an Waldkapital (im Wert von 45 Milliarden US-Dollar im Jahr 2007), sondern auch alle potenziellen zukünftigen Einnahmen und zukünftigen Arbeitsplätze, die aus ihrer nachhaltigen Bewirtschaftung von Holz und Nichtholzprodukten abgeleitet werden könnten, verschwinden. Die schwerwiegendste Folge der Entwaldung ist jedoch der Verlust der biologischen Vielfalt (geschätztes jährliches Aussterben von 50.000 Arten). Die Entwaldung trägt auch wesentlich zur globalen Erwärmung bei (etwa 25% der gesamten CO2 Emissionen); sie stört Wettermuster, was zu heißerem und trockenerem Wetter führt, beeinträchtigt die Wasserqualität und den Wasserfluss und trägt zur Bodendegradation und Wüstenbildung bei.

FLEGT steht für Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade. Der FLEGT-Aktionsplan der EU wurde 2003 mit dem Ziel aufgestellt, den illegalen Holzeinschlag durch die Stärkung der nachhaltigen und legalen Waldbewirtschaftung, die Verbesserung der Governance und die Förderung des Handels mit legal erzeugtem Holz zu reduzieren. Die Partnerschaften im Rahmen von FLEGT transformieren den Holzsektor der beteiligten Länder, um illegalen Holzeinschlag zu bekämpfen, die Forstpolitik zu stärken und eine nachhaltige wirtschaftliche Entwicklung zu fördern.

Über importierte Entwaldung

Importierte Entwaldung ist die Entwaldung, die durch die Produktion von Gütern verursacht wird, die von einer Bevölkerung anderswo konsumiert werden.

Die größeren Importeure der Entwaldung sind die Länder mit hohem Einkommen, China und Indien, hauptsächlich durch den Import von landwirtschaftlichen Produkten, Zellstoff und Papier, Energie und Mineralien.

Forest-Risk Commodities (FRC) sind global gehandelte Güter und Rohstoffe, die aus tropischen Waldökosystemen stammen, entweder direkt aus Waldgebieten oder aus Gebieten, die zuvor unter Waldbedeckung lagen, deren Gewinnung oder Produktion erheblich zur globalen tropischen Entwaldung und Degradation beiträgt.

Zur Landnutzungs-Governance

Governance bezeichnet die Bildung und Verwaltung der formellen und informellen Regeln, die den öffentlichen Raum regulieren, die Arena, in der der Staat sowie wirtschaftliche und gesellschaftliche Akteure interagieren, um Entscheidungen zu treffen (Hydén und Mease, 2004).

Bei der Landnutzungs-Governance geht es um die Entscheidungen, die in Bezug auf den Zugang zu Land und seine Nutzung getroffen werden, die Art und Weise, wie diese Entscheidungen umgesetzt und durchgesetzt werden, und die Art und Weise, wie konkurrierende Interessen an Land verwaltet werden.

Es ist die Art und Weise, wie öffentliche und private Akteure, einschließlich formeller und informeller Institutionen, und andere Interessengruppen verbindliche Entscheidungen über die Bewirtschaftung, Nutzung und Erhaltung von Waldressourcen verhandeln, treffen und durchsetzen.

In den meisten Teilen der Welt ist der Staat nach wie vor die dominierende Autorität bei der Verwaltung der Wälder. Die derzeitige Wald-Governance erfolgt hauptsächlich in drei Formen: Dezentralisierung (der Staat überträgt technische Kompetenzen und / oder formale Befugnisse auf die lokale Verwaltung), Beteiligung (Waldbewirtschaftung wird von lokalen Gemeinschaften selbst oder gemeinsam mit regionalen Forstbehörden durchgeführt) und Vermarktung (marktbasierte Mechanismen werden angewendet, um die Erhaltung oder Verbesserung der Wälder zu gewährleisten).

Auf globaler Ebene ist die Waldpolitik stark fragmentiert. Das internationale Forstregime umfasst Regelungen in verschiedenen waldbezogenen zwischenstaatlichen Gremien, z. UNFCCC, CBD, UNFF, etc. Darüber hinaus wurden mehrere (oft marktbasierte) Governance-Rahmenbedingungen unter Einbeziehung privater Akteure eingerichtet. Beispiele sind partizipative Waldbewirtschaftung (PFM) in ihren verschiedenen Formen, Waldzertifizierung (mit ihren beiden Hauptproponenten, dem Forest Stewardship Council – FSC und dem Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification – PEFC) oder die verschiedenen Payment for Ecosystem Services (PES) -Programme (einschließlich REDD+).

Ein Interesse an der Entwicklung eines globalen Rahmens zur Bekämpfung der Entwaldung wurde vor einigen Jahrzehnten von einigen Ländern bekundet, jedoch wurde keine Einigung erzielt.

Auf nationaler und regionaler Ebene befassen sich mehrere Verordnungen mit importierter Entwaldung. So regelt beispielsweise die FLEGT-Verordnung der EU (2005) die Einfuhr von Holz in ihr Hoheitsgebiet, indem sie mit Drittländern die freiwilligen Partnerschaftsabkommen (VPA) unterzeichnet. Andere bilaterale Abkommen, wie das Handelsförderungsabkommen der Vereinigten Staaten mit Peru (2007), enthalten verbindliche Bestimmungen zur Bekämpfung des illegalen Holzeinschlags, zur Verbesserung der Durchsetzung von Waldgesetzgebung, zur Nachverfolgung geschützter Baumarten entlang der Lieferkette und zur Verwaltung von Waldkonzessionen. Viele andere Länder haben ebenfalls Pläne, Vorschriften zu entwickeln, um importierte Entwaldung zu behandeln.

Zu (importierter) Entwaldung, Landnutzung/Forstpolitik – und Klimawandel

Die Rodung von Wäldern reduziert nicht nur die Anzahl der Bäume, die Treibhausgase einfangen und verhindern, dass sie sich in der Atmosphäre ansammeln und die Erde erwärmen, sondern sie verursacht auch Emissionen, indem der in Bäumen gespeicherte Kohlenstoff in die Atmosphäre zurückgeführt wird. Entwaldung verursacht etwa 10-20% der globalen Emissionen.

Sie sollte eine berechenbare, offene und informierte Politikgestaltung auf der Grundlage transparenter Prozesse fördern sowie eine Verwaltung, die von professionellem Ethos durchdrungen ist. Sie sollte auch die Durchsetzungskraft von verantwortungsvoll handelnden Regierungen stärken, und eine starke Zivilgesellschaft unterstützen, die an Entscheidungen im Zusammenhang mit dem Sektor teilnimmt.

Español

Preparado en septiembre de 2021 por el Dr. Nelson Grima y Dikshya Devkota, gerentes del proyecto IUFRO-GFEP

Sobre la deforestación

Según la FAO, deforestación es la conversión de los bosques a otro uso del suelo o la reducción a largo plazo (>10 años) de la cubierta del dosel forestal por debajo del 10% del área. La deforestación entendida ampliamente también considera la degradación que reduce la calidad del bosque.

Según la FAO, de 2015 a 2020, los países colaboradores reportaron una pérdida global de cobertura arbórea del 1,64%, mientras que Global Forest Watch (GFW) estimó a partir de datos de teledetección una pérdida del 4,19% durante el mismo período. GFW provee un período más largo en el que se muestra que desde 2001 hasta 2020 se perdieron 411,4 Mha (10,5%) de cubierta arbórea en el mundo.

“Las causas directas más importantes de la deforestación son la conversión de tierras forestales para la agricultura y la ganadería, la tala, la urbanización, la minería y la explotación petrolera, la lluvia ácida y los incendios” (FAO 2007, p.11).

Además de las causas directas, las causas indirectas incluyen importantes fenómenos económicos internacionales, estructuras sociales profundamente enraizadas que dan lugar a desigualdades en la tenencia de la tierra, discriminación contra poblaciones indígenas, agricultura de subsistencia y pobreza en general, factores políticos como la falta de democracia participativa, la influencia del Ejército y la explotación de las zonas rurales por parte de las élites urbanas, y el consumo excesivo de los consumidores en los países con altos ingresos económicos (FAO 2007).

La deforestación tiene muchas consecuencias socioecológicas y económicas con impactos devastadores a largo plazo, como por ejemplo la destrucción de las formas de vida tradicionales y las creencias religiosas, la desintegración de las instituciones sociales, o la invasión de las comunidades indígenas, lo cual provoca enfrentamientos violentos. Desde un punto de vista económico, la deforestación no sólo representa una pérdida de capital forestal (valorado en 45 mil millones de dólares en 2007), sino que también desaparecen todos los potenciales ingresos futuros y las oportunidades de empleo que podrían derivarse de la gestión sostenible de los productos forestales maderables y no maderables. Una de las consecuencia más graves de la deforestación es la pérdida de biodiversidad (la tasa de extinción se estima en 50.000 especies anualmente). La deforestación también contribuye de forma importante al calentamiento global (alrededor del 25% del total global de las emisiones de CO2), altera los patrones climáticos creando un clima más cálido y seco, afecta la calidad y el flujo del agua, y contribuye a la degradación del suelo y a la desertificación.

FLEGT son las siglas de Forest Law Enforcement, Governance, and Trade (en español, Aplicación de las Leyes, Governanza, y Comercio Forestales). El Plan de Acción FLEGT de la UE se estableció en 2003 con el objetivo de reducir la tala ilegal mediante el fortalecimiento de la gestión forestal sostenible y legal, el mejoramiento de la gobernanza y el fomento del comercio de la madera producida legalmente. Se han formado asociaciones en el marco de FLEGT para transforman el sector maderero de los países participantes, para combatir la tala ilegal, reforzar la gobernanza forestal y fomentar el desarrollo económico sostenible.

Sobre la deforestación importada

La deforestación importada es la deforestación causada por la producción de bienes que son consumidos por una población en otro lugar.

Los mayores importadores de deforestación son los países con altos ingresos económicos, China e India, principalmente a través de la importación de productos agrícolas, pulpa y papel, energía y minerales.

Los productos de riesgo forestal son “bienes y materias primas que se comercializan a nivel mundial y que proceden de ecosistemas forestales tropicales, ya sea directamente de zonas forestales o de zonas anteriormente cubiertas por bosques, cuya extracción o producción contribuye de forma significativa a la deforestación y degradación tropical mundial”.

Sobre la gobernanza del uso del suelo

La gobernanza se refiere a la formación y administración de las normas formales e informales que regulan el ámbito público, el ámbito en la cual el Estado y los actores económicos y sociales interactúan para tomar decisiones (Hydén y Mease, 2004).

La gobernanza del uso del suelo se refiere a las decisiones que se toman en relación con el acceso a la tierra y su uso, la manera en que estas decisiones se implementan y se hacen cumplir, y la forma en que se gestionan los conflictos de intereses sobre la tierra.

Es la forma en que los actores públicos y privados, incluidas las instituciones formales e informales y otras partes interesadas, negocian, toman y adoptan decisiones vinculantes sobre la gestión, el uso y la conservación de los recursos forestales.

En la mayor parte del mundo, el Estado sigue siendo la autoridad dominante en cuanto a la gobernanza de los bosques. Actualmente, la gobernanza forestal se da principalmente en tres formas: la descentralización (el Estado transfiere la capacidad técnica y/o la autoridad formal a la administración local), la participación (la gestión de los bosques la llevan a cabo las propias comunidades locales o conjuntamente con los departamentos forestales regionales) y la mercantilización (se aplican mecanismos basados en el libre mercado para garantizar la conservación o la mejora de los bosques).

A nivel mundial, la gobernanza forestal está muy fragmentada. El régimen forestal internacional incluye regulaciones en varios organismos intergubernamentales relacionados con los bosques, como la CMNUCC, el CDB, el FNUB, etc. Además, se han establecido varios marcos de gobernanza (a menudo basados en el libre mercado) en los que participan actores privados. Algunos ejemplos son la Gestión Forestal Participativa (GFP) en sus diversas formas, la certificación forestal (cuyos dos principales promotores son el Consejo de Administración Forestal – FSC, y el Programa para el Reconocimiento de la Certificación Forestal – PEFC), o los diferentes sistemas de Pago por Servicios Ecosistémicos – PSE o PSA (incluido REDD+).

Hace varias décadas, algunos países expresaron su interés por desarrollar un marco global para abordar la deforestación, pero no se llegó a ningún acuerdo.

A nivel nacional y regional, varias normativas abordan la deforestación importada. Por ejemplo, la normativa FLEGT de la UE (2005) controla la entrada de madera en su territorio por medio de la firma con terceros países de los Acuerdos Voluntarios de Asociación (AVA). Otros acuerdos bilaterales, como el acuerdo de promoción comercial de Estados Unidos con Perú (2007), contienen disposiciones obligatorias para abordar la tala ilegal, mejorar la aplicación de las leyes forestales, o dar seguimiento a las especies de árboles protegidas a lo largo de la cadena de suministro y la gestión de las concesiones forestales. Muchos otros países también tienen planes para desarrollar normativas que aborden la deforestación importada.

Sobre la deforestación (importada), el uso del suelo/la gobernanza forestal, y el cambio climático

La tala de bosques no sólo reduce el número de árboles que capturan los gases de efecto invernadero impidiendo que estos gases se acumulen en la atmósfera y calienten la Tierra, sino que también crea emisiones al liberar de nuevo el carbono almacenado en los árboles a la atmósfera. La deforestación provoca alrededor del 10-20% de las emisiones de CO2 mundiales.

Deberían promover políticas previsibles, abiertas e informadas, basadas en procesos transparentes, así como promover una burocracia impregnada de ética profesional, un órgano ejecutivo del gobierno responsable de sus acciones y una sociedad civil fuerte que participe en las decisiones relacionadas con el sector.

Facts & Figures

Facts and figures

English

Forests cover 4.06 billion hectares (31 percent of the global land area) or approximately 5 000m2 (or 50 x 100m) per person, but forests are not equally distributed around the globe. More than half of the world’s forests are found in only five countries (the Russian Federation, Brazil, Canada, the United States of America, and China) and two-thirds of forests are found in ten countries. Approximately half the forest area is relatively intact, and more than one-third is primary forest (i.e., naturally regenerated forests of native species, where there are no visible indications of human activities and the ecological processes are not significantly disturbed)” (FAO, 2020/b).

Since 1990 “420 million hectares of forest have been lost through conversion to other land uses, although the rate of deforestation has decreased over the past three decades” (FAO, 2020/b).

“Between 2015 and 2020, the rate of deforestation was estimated at 10 million hectares per year, down from 16 million hectares per year in the 1990s. The area of primary forest worldwide has decreased by over 80 million hectares since 1990” (FAO, 2020/b).

“While the northern hemisphere and higher income countries are increasing their forest cover, South-East Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America still lose forest land at an alarming rate. In 2010-2020, Africa had the largest annual rate of net forest loss, at 3.9 million hectares, followed by South America, at 2.6 million hectares” (FAO, 2020/b).

“Africa had the highest net loss of forest area in 2010 –2020, with a loss of 3.94 million hectares per year, followed by South America with 2.60 million hectares per year. Since 1990, Africa has reported an increase in the rate of net loss, while South America’s losses have decreased substantially since 2010” (FAO, 2020/a).

The global rate of net forest loss decreased substantially over the periods 1990–2020 (7.8 million ha per year), 2000–2010 (5.2 million ha per year), and 2010–2020 (4.7 million ha per year) due to reduction in deforestation in some countries and increases in forest area in others through afforestation and the natural expansion of forests. However, the rate of decline of net forest loss slowed in the most recent decade due to a reduction in the rate of forest expansion (FAO, 2020/c) .

“Attributed forest loss was also dominated by a few commodities, with more than 40% of the embodied deforestation associated with expanding pastures for cattlemeat production (2.2 Mha yr−1). Other commodities/commodity groups found to be associated with a large share of deforestation were forestry products (0.8 Mha yr−1), palm oil (0.4 Mha yr−1), other cereals (0.4 Mha yr−1) and soybeans (0.4 Mha yr−1), together accounting approximately for another 40% of total embodied deforestation” (Pendrill et al., 2019).

“While deforestation was mainly driven by domestic demand, in total 26% of the embodied deforestation was exported” (Pendrill et al., 2019).

“In total, the share of deforestation attributed to exports was greatest for crops (40%), with some— palm oil, soybeans, tree nuts and other crops—primarily destined for export (63%–77%)” (Pendrill et al., 2019).

“High-income countries were the largest ‘importers’ of deforestation, accounting for 40% of it. This means they were responsible for 12% of global deforestation” (Our World in Data, 2021).

“If we sum countries’ imported deforestation by World Bank income group, we find that high-income countries were responsible for 40% of imported deforestation; upper-middle income for 25%; lower-middle income for 20%; and low income for 5%” (Our World in Data 2021).

“The Congo Basin, the Amazonas and Borneo collectively contain over 80% of the world’s tropical forests” (Henders et al., 2015).

“In 2011, beef was the main driver of forest loss…accounting for nearly 60 percent of embodied deforestation (2.1 Mha, of which 1.6 Mha in Brazil alone) and just over half of embodied emissions (860 ± 203 MtCO2). Soybean production was the second largest source of embodied deforestation area (0.6 Mha; of which 6% is embodied in the crops double-cropped with soy), whereas oil palm was the second largest source of embodied emissions (327 ± 73 MtCO2)” (Henders et al., 2015).

“Conversion of forest land for agricultural use is the key driver of deforestation. Estimates suggest that 40 percent of deforestation in tropical and subtropical countries is driven by commercial agriculture, and 33 percent by subsistence agriculture.” (Hosonuma et al., 2012).

“In Latin America and South-East Asia commercial-scale drivers dominate while in Sub-Saharan Africa deforestation is linked predominantly to subsistence. However, recent years have seen an increase in commercial agriculture also in Africa.” (FAO, 2020/a)

“Direct observations of CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere, which began in 1958, show that the atmosphere has only retained roughly half of the CO2 emitted by human activities due to the combustion of 15 fossil fuels and land-use change such as deforestation.” (IPCC, 2021)

“These large gross fluxes show the relevance of land management such as harvesting or rotational agriculture and the large potential to reduce emissions by halting deforestation and degradation.” (IPCC, 2021)

“The main human causes of climate change are the heat-absorbing greenhouse gases released by fossil fuel combustion, deforestation, and agriculture, which warm the planet …” (IPCC, 2021)

“24 Member States reported over 449 636 tonnes of timber products on FLEGT licenses that were received in 2020 and validated. Close to half (49.7%) of the licensed and validated products consisted of paper and paper products (HS48).” (European Commission, 2021).

“Seven countries have signed a Voluntary Partnership Agreements (VPA) with the EU and are currently developing the systems needed to control, verify and license legal timber. One of these, Indonesia, is issuing FLEGT licenses. These countries are known as ‘VPA partner countries’. Nine more countries are in negotiations with the EU.” (EUFLEGT, 2021).

Contreras-Hermosilla A. (2000). The underlying causes of forest decline. Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) Occasional Paper, 30, 9, DOI: https://doi.org/10.17528/cifor/000626.

European Commission. (2021). Flegt Regulation: Union-Wide Overview for the Year 2020. European Commission. Available at: https://ec.europa.eu/environment/forests/pdf/FLEGT%20Overview%20for%20the%20year%202020_07.07.21.pdf [Accessed on 17 September 2021].

EUFLEGT. (2021). Voluntary Partnership Agreements. EUFLEGT. Available at: https://www.euflegt.efi.int/vpa [Accessed on 17 September 2021].

FAO. (2007). Manual on Deforestation, Degradation, and Fragmentation using Remote Sensing and GIS. FAO. Available at: http://www.fao.org/3/ap163e/ap163e.pdf [Accessed on 17 September 2021].

FAO (2018). Zero-deforestation commitments A new avenue towards enhanced forest governance? FAO: Rome. pp. 4-15. SBN 978-92-5-130630-7.

FAO (2020/a). The State of the World’s Forests 2020. Forests, biodiversity and people. FAO: Rome. pp. 12-88. ISBN 9789251324196.

FAO (2020/b). State of Forests. FAO. Available at: http://www.fao.org/state-of-forests/en/ [Accessed on 17 September 2021].

FAO (2020/c). Global Forest Resources Assessment 2020 – Key findings. FAO: Rome. pp. 2-5. Available at: http://www.fao.org/3/ca8753en/CA8753EN.pdf [Accessed on 23 September 2021].

Hosonuma N., Herold M., De Sy V., De Fries R., Brockhaus M., Verchot L., Angelsen A., and Romijn E. (2012) An assessment of deforestation and forest degradation drivers in developing countries. Environmental Research Letters, 7, 4. 1-12, DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/044009.

Henders H., Persson M., Kastner T. (2015). Trading forests: land-use change and carbon emissions embodied in production and exports of forest-risk commodities. Environ. Res. Lett., 10, 1-13, DOI:10.1088/1748-9326/10/12/125012.

IPCC (2021). Climate Change 2021 The Physical Science Basis. IPCC. Available at: https://www.ipcc.ch/report/ar6/wg1/downloads/report/IPCC_AR6_WGI_Full_Report.pdf [Accessed on 17 September 2021].

Our World in Data (2013). Imported deforestation. Available at: https://ourworldindata.org/grapher/imported-deforestation [Accessed on 17 September 2021].

Pendrill F., Persson M., Godar J., Kastner T. et al. (2019). Deforestation displaced: trade in forest-risk commodities and the prospects for a global forest. Environmental Research Letters, 14, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/ab0d4.

Our World in Data. (2021). Do rich countries import deforestation from overseas? Available at: https://ourworldindata.org/grapher/imported-deforestation [Accessed on 17 September 2021].

Transforming Agriculture and Food Systems: Halting Deforestation and Promoting Sustainable Production and Consumption of Forest Products. Available at: http://www.fao.org/3/nd565en/nd565en.pdf [Accessed on 17 September 2021].

Deutsch

Wälder bedecken 4,06 Milliarden Hektar (31 Prozent der globalen Landfläche) oder etwa 5000m2 (oder 50m x 100m) pro Person, aber sie sind nicht gleichmäßig auf der ganzen Welt verteilt. Mehr als die Hälfte der Wälder der Welt befinden sich in nur fünf Ländern (Russische Föderation, Brasilien, Kanada, die Vereinigten Staaten von Amerika und China) und zwei Drittel der Wälder befinden sich in zehn Ländern. Etwa die Hälfte der Waldfläche ist relativ intakt, und mehr als ein Drittel ist Primärwald (d.h. natürlich regenerierte Wälder einheimischer Arten, in denen es keine sichtbaren Hinweise auf menschliche Aktivitäten gibt und die ökologischen Prozesse nicht signifikant gestört werden)” (FAO, 2020/ b).

Seit 1990 “sind 420 Millionen Hektar Wald durch Umwandlung in andere Landnutzungen verloren gegangen, obwohl die Entwaldungsrate in den letzten drei Jahrzehnten zurückgegangen ist” (FAO, 2020/b).

“Zwischen 2015 und 2020 wurde die Entwaldungsrate auf 10 Millionen Hektar pro Jahr geschätzt, gegenüber 16 Millionen Hektar pro Jahr in den 1990er Jahren. Die Primärwaldfläche weltweit ist seit 1990 um über 80 Millionen Hektar zurückgegangen” (FAO, 2020/b).

“Während die nördliche Hemisphäre und Länder mit höherem Einkommen ihre Waldbedeckung erhöhen, verlieren Südostasien, Subsahara-Afrika und Lateinamerika immer noch Waldland mit alarmierender Geschwindigkeit. In den Jahren 2010-2020 hatte Afrika mit 3,9 Millionen Hektar die größte jährliche Nettowaldverlustrate, gefolgt von Südamerika mit 2,6 Millionen Hektar” (FAO, 2020/b).

Afrika hatte in den Jahren 2010-2020 mit einem Verlust von 3,94 Millionen Hektar pro Jahr den höchsten Nettoverlust an Waldfläche, gefolgt von Südamerikamit 2,60 Millionen Hektar pro Jahr. Seit 1990 hat Afrika einen Anstieg der Nettoverlustrate gemeldet, während die Verluste Südamerikas seit 2010 erheblich zurückgegangen sind” (FAO, 2020/a).

Die globale Nettowaldverlustrate ging in den Zeiträumen 1990-2020 (7,8 Mio. ha pro Jahr), 2000-2010 (5,2 Mio. ha pro Jahr) und 2010-2020 (4,7 Mio. ha pro Jahr) aufgrund der Verringerung der Entwaldung in einigen Ländern und der Zunahme der Waldfläche in anderen Ländern durch Aufforstung und natürliche Ausdehnung der Wälder erheblich zurück. Die Rate des Rückgangs des Nettowaldverlusts verlangsamte sich jedoch in den letzten zehn Jahren aufgrund einer Verringerung der Ausdehnungsrate von Waldflächen (FAO, 2020/c).

“Der zugeschriebene Waldverlust wurde auch von einigen wenigen Rohstoffen dominiert, wobei mehr als 40% der beinhalteten Entwaldung mit expandierenden Weiden für die Rindfleischproduktion verbunden waren (2,2 Mha Jahre−1). Andere Rohstoffe/Warengruppen, die mit einem großen Anteil der Entwaldung in Verbindung gebracht wurden, waren Forstprodukte (0,8 Mha Jahr−1), Palmöl (0,4 Mha Jahr−1), diverses Getreide (0,4 Mha Jahr−1) und Sojabohnen (0,4 Mha Jahr−1), die zusammen etwa weitere 40% der gesamten verkörperten Entwaldung ausmachen” (Pendrill et al., 2019).

“Während die Entwaldung hauptsächlich von der Binnennachfrage getrieben wurde, wurden insgesamt 26% der verkörperten Entwaldung exportiert” (Pendrill et al., 2019).

“Insgesamt war der Anteil der Entwaldung, der auf Exporte zurückgeführt wurde, für Nutzpflanzen am größten (40%), wobei einige – Palmöl, Sojabohnen, Nüsse und andere Kulturen – hauptsächlich für den Export bestimmt waren (63% – 77%)” (Pendrill et al., 2019).

“Länder mit hohem Einkommen waren mit 40% die größten ‘Importeure’ von Entwaldung. Das bedeutet, dass sie für 12% der globalen Entwaldung verantwortlich waren” (Our World inData, 2021).

“Wenn wir die importierte Entwaldung der Länder nach der Einkommensgruppe der Weltbank zusammenfassen, stellen wir fest, dass Länder mit hohem Einkommen für 40% der importierten Entwaldung verantwortlich waren; oberes mittleres Einkommen für 25%; unteres mittleres Einkommen für 20%; und niedriges Einkommen für 5%” (Our World in Data 2021).

“Das Kongobecken, der Amazonas und Borneo enthalten zusammen über 80% der tropischen Wälder der Welt” (Henders et al., 2015).

“Im Jahr 2011 war Rindfleisch der Haupttreiber des Waldverlusts… fast 60 Prozent der „embodied deforestation“, also der von landwirtschaftlicher Produktion verursachten Entwaldung (2,1 Mha, davon 1,6 Mha allein in Brasilien) und etwas mehr als die Hälfte der von landwirtschaftlicher Produktion verursachten Emissionen (860 ± 203 MtCO2) verantwortlich. Die Sojabohnenproduktion war die zweitgrößte Quelle für die von landwirtschaftlicher Produktion verursachte Entwaldungsfläche (0,6 Mha; davon 6% in den mit Soja doppelt beschnittenen Kulturen), während Ölpalmen die zweitgrößte Quelle für solche Emissionen waren (327 ± 73 MtCO2)”(Henders et al., 2015).

Anm. Übersetzung: “embodied deforestation”: siehe Consumption Impact Study – Forests – Environment – European Commission (europa.eu)

“Die Umwandlung von Waldflächen für die landwirtschaftliche Nutzung ist der Haupttreiber der Entwaldung. Schätzungen zufolge werden 40 Prozent der Entwaldung in tropischen und subtropischen Ländern durch kommerzielle Landwirtschaft und 33 Prozent durch Subsistenzlandwirtschaft verursacht.” (Hosonuma et al., 2012).

“In Lateinamerika und Südostasien dominieren kommerzielle Treiber, während in Subsahara-Afrika die Entwaldung überwiegend mit dem Lebensunterhalt zusammenhängt. In den letzten Jahren hat die kommerzielle Landwirtschaft jedoch auch in Afrika zugenommen.” (FAO, 2020/a)

“Direkte Beobachtungen der CO2-Konzentrationen in der Atmosphäre, die 1958 begannen, zeigen, dass die Atmosphäre aufgrund der Verbrennung von fossilen Brennstoffen und Landnutzungsänderungen wie Entwaldung nur etwa die Hälfte des durch menschliche Aktivitäten emittierten CO2 zurückgehalten hat.” (IPCC, 2021)

“Diese großen Bruttoflüsse zeigen die Relevanz des Landmanagements wie Ernte oder Fruchtfolgelandwirtschaft und das große Potenzial, Emissionen durch einen Stopp von Entwaldung und Degradation zu reduzieren.” (IPCC, 2021)

“Die Hauptursachen des Klimawandels sind die wärmeabsorbierenden Treibhausgase, die durch die Verbrennung fossiler Brennstoffe, die Entwaldung und die Landwirtschaft freigesetzt werden und den Planeten erwärmen, …” (IPCC, 2021)

“Vierundzwanzig Mitgliedstaaten meldeten über 449 636 Tonnen Holzprodukte über FLEGT-Genehmigungen, die 2020 erhalten und validiert wurden. Fast die Hälfte (49,7%) der lizenzierten und validierten Produkte bestand aus Papier und Papierprodukten (HS48).” (Europäische Kommission, 2021).

“Sieben Länder haben ein freiwilliges Partnerschaftsabkommen (VPA) mit der EU unterzeichnet und entwickeln derzeit Systeme, die zur Kontrolle, Überprüfung und Lizenzierung von legalem Holz erforderlich sind. Eines davon, mit Indonesien, erteilt FLEGT-Genehmigungen. Diese Länder werden als “VPA-Partnerländer” bezeichnet. Neun weitere Länder befinden sich in Verhandlungen mit der EU.” (EUFLEGT, 2021).

Contreras-Hermosilla A. (2000). Die zugrunde liegenden Ursachen des Waldrückgangs. Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) Occasional Paper, 30, 9, DOI: https://doi.org/10.17528/cifor/000626.

Europäische Kommission. (2021). Flegt-Verordnung: Unionsweiter Überblick für das Jahr 2020. Europäische Kommission. Verfügbar unter: https://ec.europa.eu/environment/forests/pdf/FLEGT%20Overview%20for%20the%20year%202020_07.07.21.pdf [Zugriff am 17. September 2021].

EUFLEGT. (2021). Freiwillige Partnerschaftsvereinbarungen. EUFLEGT. Verfügbar unter: https://www.euflegt.efi.int/vpa [Zugriff am 17. September 2021].

FAO. (2007). Manual on Deforestation, Degradation, and Fragmentation using Remote Sensing and GIS. FAO. Verfügbar unter: http://www.fao.org/3/ap163e/ap163e.pdf [Zugriff am 17. September 2021].

FAO (2018). Null-Entwaldungsverpflichtungen Ein neuer Weg zu einer verbesserten Forstpolitik? FAO: Rom. S. 4-15. SBN 978-92-5-130630-7.

FAO (2020/a). Der Zustand der Wälder der Welt 2020. Wälder, Biodiversität und Menschen. FAO: Rom. S. 12-88. ISBN 9789251324196.

FAO (2020/b). Zustand der Wälder. FAO. Verfügbar unter: http://www.fao.org/state-of-forests/en/ [Zugriff am 17. September 2021].

FAO (2020/c). Global Forest Resources Assessment 2020 – Wichtigste Ergebnisse. FAO: Rom. S. 2-5. Verfügbar unter: http://www.fao.org/3/ca8753en/CA8753EN.pdf [Zugriff am 23. September 2021].

Hosonuma N. == Nachweise ==== Herr Präsident, meine Ungn. , De Sy V. == Nachweise ==== Herr Präsident, meine Ungn. , Brockhaus M. , Verchot L. , Angelsen A. und Romijn E. (2012) Eine Bewertung der Triebkräfte für Entwaldung und Walddegradierung in Entwicklungsländern. Environmental Research Letters, 7, 4. 1-12, DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/044009.

Henders H., Persson M., Kastner T. (2015). Handel mit Wäldern: Landnutzungsänderungen und Kohlenstoffemissionen, die bei der Produktion und dem Export von waldgefährdeten Rohstoffen verkörpert sind. Umgeben. Res. Lett., 10, 1-13, DOI:10.1088/1748-9326/10/12/125012.

IPCC (2021). Klimawandel 2021 Die physikalisch-wissenschaftliche Grundlage. IPCC. Verfügbar unter: https://www.ipcc.ch/report/ar6/wg1/downloads/report/IPCC_AR6_WGI_Full_Report.pdf [Zugriff am 17. September 2021].

Unsere Welt in Daten (2013). Importierte Entwaldung. Verfügbar unter: https://ourworldindata.org/grapher/imported-deforestation [Zugriff am 17. September 2021].

Pendrill F. == Nachweise ==== Herr Präsident, meinen Herr Präsident! , Godar J., Kastner T. et al. (2019). Abholzung verdrängt: Handel mit waldgefährdeten Rohstoffen und die Aussichten für einen globalen Wald. Umwelt research Letters,14, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/ab0d4.

Unsere Welt in Daten. (2021). Importieren reiche Länder Entwaldung aus Übersee? Verfügbar unter: https://ourworldindata.org/grapher/imported-deforestation [Zugriff am 17. September 2021].

Transformation von Agrar- und Ernährungssystemen: Stopp der Entwaldung und Förderung der nachhaltigen Produktion und des nachhaltigen Konsums von Forstprodukten. Verfügbar unter: http://www.fao.org/3/nd565en/nd565en.pdf [Zugriff am 17. September 2021].

Español

Los bosques cubren 4,06 mil millones de hectáreas (el 31% de la superficie terrestre mundial) o aproximadamente 5.000 m2 (o 50×100 m) por persona, pero los bosques no están distribuidos de forma equitativa en todo el planeta. Más de la mitad de los bosques del mundo se encuentran en sólo cinco países (la Federación Rusa, Brasil, Canadá, Estados Unidos de América y China) y dos tercios de los bosques se encuentran en diez países. Aproximadamente la mitad de la superficie forestal está relativamente intacta, y más de un tercio son bosques primarios (es decir, bosques de especies autóctonas regenerados naturalmente, en los que no hay indicios visibles de actividades humanas y los procesos ecológicos no están significativamente alterados)” (FAO, 2020/b).

Desde 1990 “se han perdido 420 millones de hectáreas de bosque por la conversión a otros usos del suelo, aunque la tasa de deforestación ha disminuido en las últimas tres décadas” (FAO, 2020/b).

“Entre 2015 y 2020, la tasa de deforestación se estimó en 10 millones de hectáreas por año, por debajo de los 16 millones de hectáreas anuales estimados en la década de 1990. La superficie de bosque primario en todo el mundo ha disminuido en más de 80 millones de hectáreas desde 1990” (FAO, 2020/b).

“Mientras que el hemisferio norte y los países con altos ingresos económicos están aumentando su cubierta forestal, el sudeste asiático, el África subsahariana y América Latina siguen perdiendo tierras forestales a un ritmo alarmante. En 2010-2020, África tuvo la mayor tasa anual de pérdida neta de bosques, con 3,9 millones de hectáreas, seguida de América del Sur, con 2,6 millones de hectáreas” (FAO, 2020/b).

“África tuvo la mayor pérdida neta de superficie forestal en 2010 -2020, con una pérdida de 3,94 millones de hectáreas por año, seguida de América del Sur con 2,60 millones de hectáreas por año. Desde 1990, África ha reportado un aumento en la tasa de pérdida neta, mientras que las pérdidas de América del Sur han disminuido sustancialmente desde 2010”. (FAO, 2020/a)

La tasa mundial de pérdida neta de bosques disminuyó sustancialmente durante los períodos 1990-2020 (7,8 millones de hectáreas al año), 2000-2010 (5,2 millones de hectáreas al año) y 2010-2020 (4,7 millones de hectáreas al año) debido a la reducción de la deforestación en algunos países y al aumento de la superficie forestal en otros mediante la forestación y la expansión natural de los bosques. Sin embargo, el ritmo de disminución de la pérdida neta de bosques se redujo en la década más reciente debido a la reducción de la tasa de expansión forestal (FAO, 2020/c)

“La pérdida de bosques también estuvo dominada por unos pocos productos, con más del 40% de la deforestación asociada a la expansión de pastos para la producción ganadera (2,2 Mha año-1). Otros productos/grupos de productos que se encontraron asociados con una gran parte de la deforestación fueron los productos forestales (0,8 Mha año-1), el aceite de palma (0,4 Mha año-1), otros cereales (0,4 Mha año-1) y la soja (0,4 Mha año-1), que en conjunto representan aproximadamente otro 40% de la deforestación total” (Pendrill et al., 2019).

“Aunque la deforestación fue impulsada principalmente por la demanda interna, en total el 26% de la deforestación fue exportada” (Pendrill et al., 2019).

“En total, la proporción de deforestación atribuida a las exportaciones fue mayor para los cultivos (40%), con algunos de ellos -aceite de palma, soja, frutos secos y otros cultivos- destinados principalmente a la exportación (63%-77%)” (Pendrill et al., 2019).

“Los países con altos ingresos económicos fueron los mayores “importadores” de deforestación, con un 40% de la misma. Esto significa que estos países fueron responsables del 12% de la deforestación mundial” (Our World in Data, 2021).

“Si sumamos la deforestación importada de los países por grupo de ingresos del Banco Mundial, encontramos que los países con altos ingresos económicos fueron responsables del 40% de la deforestación importada; los países con ingresos medios-altos, del 25%; los países con ingresos medios-bajos, del 20%; y los países con ingresos bajos, del 5%” (Nuestro Mundo en Datos 2021).

“La cuenca del Congo, el Amazonas y Borneo contienen colectivamente más del 80% de los bosques tropicales del mundo” (Henders et al., 2015).

“En 2011, la carne de vacuno fue el principal impulsor de la pérdida de bosques… representando casi el 60% de la deforestación (2,1 Mha, de las cuales 1,6 Mha fueron sólo en Brasil) y un poco más de la mitad de las emisiones de carbono (860 ± 203 MtCO2). La producción de soja fue la segunda mayor fuente de deforestación (0,6 Mha; de las cuales el 6% está incorporado en los cultivos de doble cosecha con soja), mientras que el aceite de palma fue la segunda mayor fuente de emisiones de carbono (327 ± 73 MtCO2)” (Henders et al., 2015).

“La conversión de tierras forestales para uso agrícola y ganadero es el principal impulsor de la deforestación. Las estimaciones sugieren que el 40% de la deforestación en los países tropicales y subtropicales está impulsada por la agricultura y ganadería comercial, y el 33% por la agricultura y ganadería de subsistencia.” (Hosonuma et al., 2012).

“En América Latina y el sudeste asiático predominan las causas de escala comercial, mientras que en el África subsahariana la deforestación está vinculada predominantemente a la subsistencia. Sin embargo, en los últimos años se ha producido un aumento de la agricultura y ganadería comercial también en África”. (FAO, 2020/a)

“Las observaciones directas de las concentraciones de CO2 en la atmósfera, las cuales comenzaron en 1958, muestran que la atmósfera sólo ha retenido aproximadamente la mitad del CO2 emitido por las actividades humanas debido a la combustión de 15 combustibles fósiles y a los cambios de uso del suelo, como la deforestación. “(IPCC, 2021)

“Estos flujos masivos brutos muestran la relevancia de la gestión de la tierra, como por ejemplo la cosecha o la agricultura de rotación, y el gran potencial de reducción de las emisiones al detener la deforestación y la degradación” (IPCC, 2021).

“Las principales causas humanas del cambio climático son los gases de efecto invernadero que absorben el calor y que son liberados por la combustión de combustibles fósiles, la deforestación y la agricultura y ganadería, que calientan el planeta…” (IPCC, 2021)

“24 Estados Miembros informaron de que más de 449.636 toneladas de productos madereros bajo las licencias FLEGT se recibieron y se validaron en 2020. Cerca de la mitad (49,7%) de los productos con licencia y validados consistían en papel y productos de papel (HS48).” (Comisión Europea, 2021).

“Siete países han firmado un Acuerdo Voluntario de Asociación (AVA) con la UE y están desarrollando actualmente los sistemas necesarios para controlar, verificar y conceder licencias para el uso de madera legal. Uno de ellos, Indonesia, está concediendo licencias FLEGT. Estos países se conocen como ‘países socios del AVA’. Otros nueve países están en negociaciones con la UE”. (EUFLEGT, 2021).

Contreras-Hermosilla A. (2000). The underlying causes of forest decline. Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) Occasional Paper, 30, 9, DOI: https://doi.org/10.17528/cifor/000626.

European Commission. (2021). Flegt Regulation: Union-Wide Overview for the Year 2020. European Commission. Available at: https://ec.europa.eu/environment/forests/pdf/FLEGT%20Overview%20for%20the%20year%202020_07.07.21.pdf [Accessed on 17 September 2021].

EUFLEGT. (2021). Voluntary Partnership Agreements. EUFLEGT. Available at: https://www.euflegt.efi.int/vpa [Accessed on 17 September 2021].

FAO. (2007). Manual on Deforestation, Degradation, and Fragmentation using Remote Sensing and GIS. FAO. Available at: http://www.fao.org/3/ap163e/ap163e.pdf [Accessed on 17 September 2021].

FAO (2018). Zero-deforestation commitments A new avenue towards enhanced forest governance? FAO: Rome. pp. 4-15. SBN 978-92-5-130630-7.

FAO (2020/a). The State of the World’s Forests 2020. Forests, biodiversity and people. FAO: Rome. pp. 12-88. ISBN 9789251324196.

FAO (2020/b). State of Forests. FAO. Available at: http://www.fao.org/state-of-forests/en/ [Accessed on 17 September 2021].

FAO (2020/c). Global Forest Resources Assessment 2020 – Key findings. FAO: Rome. pp. 2-5. Available at: http://www.fao.org/3/ca8753en/CA8753EN.pdf [Accessed on 23 September 2021].

Hosonuma N., Herold M., De Sy V., De Fries R., Brockhaus M., Verchot L., Angelsen A., and Romijn E. (2012) An assessment of deforestation and forest degradation drivers in developing countries. Environmental Research Letters, 7, 4. 1-12, DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/044009.

Henders H., Persson M., Kastner T. (2015). Trading forests: land-use change and carbon emissions embodied in production and exports of forest-risk commodities. Environ. Res. Lett., 10, 1-13, DOI:10.1088/1748-9326/10/12/125012.

IPCC (2021). Climate Change 2021 The Physical Science Basis. IPCC. Available at: https://www.ipcc.ch/report/ar6/wg1/downloads/report/IPCC_AR6_WGI_Full_Report.pdf [Accessed on 17 September 2021].

Our World in Data (2013). Imported deforestation. Available at: https://ourworldindata.org/grapher/imported-deforestation [Accessed on 17 September 2021].

Pendrill F., Persson M., Godar J., Kastner T. et al. (2019). Deforestation displaced: trade in forest-risk commodities and the prospects for a global forest. Environmental Research Letters, 14, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/ab0d4.

Our World in Data. (2021). Do rich countries import deforestation from overseas? Available at: https://ourworldindata.org/grapher/imported-deforestation [Accessed on 17 September 2021].

Transforming Agriculture and Food Systems: Halting Deforestation and Promoting Sustainable Production and Consumption of Forest Products. Available at: http://www.fao.org/3/nd565en/nd565en.pdf [Accessed on 17 September 2021].

Infographics & Photos

Infographics on deforestation

Main causes of forest decline

Download

Net forest area change by region, 1990-2020

Download

Global forest expansion and deforestation, 1990-2020

Download

Priority action areas to reduce deforestation and degradation

Download

Voluntary certification schemes for forest-risk commodities and deforestation

Download

Infographics on forest governance

The world’s biggest forest-risk commodities

Download

The world’s largest forest-depleting industries

Download

Global consequences of tropical deforestation

Download

International Forest Governance and policy Arrangements (IFGAs)

Download

Photos

Cattle, Burkina Faso

A herd of cattle outside the Zorro village, Burkina Faso. Photo by Ollivier Girard/CIFOR

Download

Roads and Cattle, Brazil

Roads and cattle farming are two major drivers of deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon. Photo by Kate Evans/CIFOR

Download

Cleared land, Burkina Faso

In the Nebbou area, between Ouagadougou and Leo, cleared land for agriculture, Burkina Faso. Photo by Ollivier Girard/CIFOR

Download

Oil palm in Brazil

Oil Palm factory, photo by Miguel Pinheiro/CIFOR

Download

Haze from the forest fires, Indonesia

Haze from the forest fires blanket most parts of the landscape. The rainfall during the flight also contributed to the limited visibility. Photo by Aulia Erlangga/CIFOR

Download

Aerial view of oil palm plantation, Indonesia

Aerial footage of palm oil and the forest in Sentabai Village, West Kalimantan, 2017. Photo by Nanang Sujana/CIFOR

Download

Migration and Forests Project, Peru – Burning of land for cultivation

Burning of land for cultivation. Photo by Marlon del Aguila Guerrero/CIFOR

Download

Lipstick

“Palm oil is used in lipstick as it holds color well, doesn’t melt at high temperatures, and has a smooth application and virtually no taste” (WWF, n.d.). Image by Pasi Mämmelä from Pixabay

Download

Meat consumption

Photo by tommao wang on Unsplash

Download

Inside the Meat Products Production Line

Photo by Mark Stebnicki from Pexels

Download

Supermarket – Soap & Shampoo

Image by Marco Pomella from Pixabay

Download

Contact us

Contact us


In cooperation with:

The specialists are:

  • Dr. Metodi Sotirov

    Assistant/Associate Professor at the Chair of Forest and Environmental Policy, University of Freiburg i. Br., Germany
  • Dr. Connie McDermott

    Jackson Senior Fellow and Associate Professor Land Use and Environmental Change University of Oxford, UK
  • Dr. Pablo Pacheco

    WWF Global Forests Lead Scientist
  • Dr. Sarah Lilian Burns

    Assistant Professor at the Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias y Forestales – Universidad Nacional de La Plata Laboratorio Investigación Sistemas Ecológicos y Ambientales (LISEA), Argentina